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RRHS English IV Research Project: GMOs

Possible Perspectives

  • Food labeling to inform consumers of any genetic modifications to food is essentially irrelevant because methods for the detection of GMOs in food are unreliable.

  • Food labeling to inform consumers of any genetic modifications to food should be added to containers so that users know what they are ingesting.

  • Food labeling to inform consumers of any genetic modifications to food should not be added because GMOs do not pose a health threat.

Sampling from Our Databases

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Genetically Modified Food

This page in Opposing Viewpoints provides links to viewpoint essays as well as information in news sources, magazines, journals, reference sources, statistics, primary sources, websites, etc.  The essays linked below present two of the many viewpoints:

Miller, Henry I. "Genetically Modified Foods Have Numerous Benefits and No Known Risks." Genetic Engineering. Ed. Noël Merino. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "When Technophobia Becomes Toxic." 2012. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

Henry I. Miller argues that capitulation by food companies to activists in ceasing use of genetically engineered ingredients is dangerous and not supported by science. Miller contends that genetic engineering actually makes food safer by reducing such dangerous contaminants as fungus and mold. He concludes that making policy based on irrational technophobia is dangerous to consumers and food producers. Miller is a physician and molecular biologist, a fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, and coauthor of The Frankenfood Myth: How Protest and Politics Threaten the Biotech Revolution.

"Genetically Modified Foods Could Pose Numerous Health Risks." Genetic Engineering. Ed. Noël Merino. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Doctors' Health Warning: Avoid Genetically Modified Foods." Vol. 1. 2011. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

The Institute for Responsible Technology argues that there is no reason to believe genetically modified (GM) food is safe, but there are several reasons to believe that GM food poses health risks to humans. The institute claims that several animal studies show health problems resulting from consumption of GM food, raising serious questions about the safety for humans. The Institute for Responsible Technology is an organization that aims to educate policy makers and the public about genetically modified (GM) foods and crops.

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The results of a basic search using keywords "genetically modified" results in a page linking the researcher to information in journals, magazines, statistics, news sources, primary sources, reference sources, case studies, videos, podcasts, associations and organizations, special libraries and research centers, websites and blogs, conference presentations and reports.

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Lupien, John R. "Food Quality and Safety: Traceability and Labeling." Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. Vol. 45 No. 2 2005: 119-123. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 05 Dec. 2014.

"This article discusses food systems in general, their development over the past 120 years, and realities and problems faced by a world population of over 6 billion people. Various food and feed problems are mentioned, and the concept of 'traceability' is discussed in the context of the broader and more useful approach of using 'good practices' at all levels of the food chain."

ProQuest Staff. "Food and Nutrition Timeline." Leading Issues Timelines. 2014: n.p. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 05 Dec. 2014.

This article provides a timeline on food and nutrition in the United States from the nineteenth century to the present.

 

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Fatka, Jacqui. "GMO labels up grocery bill $500: Cornell study finds consumers will bear brunt of costs for GMO food labeling." Feedstuffs 19 May 2014: 9. General OneFile. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

Mandatory state laws on labeling genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in foods, such as those recently enacted in Vermont and proposed in New York, among other states, would cost a family of four an average of $500 in additional food costs each year and could even come in closer to the $800 midpoint of the range, according to a new study from Cornell University.

"New food test ensures proper labeling." USA Today [Magazine] Feb. 2014: 8. General OneFile. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

To help inform shoppers and enforce regulations, scientists are reporting in the journal Analytical Chemistry the first comprehensive method to detect genetic modifications in one convenient, accurate test.

Ruhs, Barbara. "Update: GMOs in foods: GMOs--ingredients that have been genetically altered--are everywhere, from fast food to frozen yogurt, but are they safe? EN answers your top questions." Environmental Nutrition Feb. 2013: 1+. General OneFile. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

This article provides an overview of GMOs, including a definition, examples of commonly used GMOs in processed foods, the risks and benefits of GMOs.

Stonebrook, Shelley. "GMOs: the controversy builds." Mother Earth News Oct.-Nov. 2013: 16. General OneFile. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

This is an update on the health risks of consuming genetically modified foods.

Sampling of Books

eBooks from GVRL

Galeotti, Sandra. "GE-Free Food Rights." Biotechnology: In Context. Ed. Brenda Wilmoth Lerner and K. Lee Lerner. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 2012. 401-404. In Context Series. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

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"The principle underlying food or pharmaceutical consumer rights is that people have the right to know what they are buying and the exact compositional content of foods and medications that are for sale on the market. " 


 

 

Phifer, Paul R. "Genetically Modified Organism." Environmental Encyclopedia. 4th ed. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 2011. 745-749. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 5 Dec. 2014.

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"Although the technological advances that allowed the creation of GMOs are impressive, as with any new technology, the benefits must be weighed against the risks."

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